Symposia

Symposia Schedule

Symposium 1:
Recent Developments in Analytical Electrochemistry: from Fundamentals to Devices
(details)

Symposium 2:
Functional Surfaces and Electrochemically Active Materials: Preparation and Applications (details)

Symposium 3:
Electrochemistry at Liquid/liquid Interfaces: From Fundamental to Applications (details)

Symposium 4:
Bioelectrochemistry: from fundamentals to applications (details)

Symposium 5:
New Electrochemical Approaches and Devices for Monitoring Diseases and Human Health (details)

Symposium 6:
Advanced lithium-ion batteries; from basics to cutting-edge technologies (details)

Symposium 7:
Next-generation Batteries: Novel chemistry and design (details)

Symposium 8:
Next Generation Batteries – S&T Challenges and Opportunities (details)

Symposium 9:
Understanding and application of fast storage processes (Supercapacitors & high power systems) (details)

Symposium 10:
Electrochemical systems for energy conversion:  Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers (details)

Symposium 11:
Electrochemical Conversion of Carbon Dioxide and its Utilization (details)

Symposium 12:
Corrosion and corrosion protection (details)

Symposium 13:
Advanced Processes for Materials Recycling: from Batteries to E-Waste (details)

Symposium 14:
Electrochemical Technology for Process Intensification and Sustainability (details)

Symposium 15:
Anodization and Its Applications in Environmental and Energy Research (details)

Symposium 16:
Mathematical modelling in electrochemistry – from molecular scale to the process design (details)

Symposium 17:
Molecular Electroanalysis (details)

Symposium 18:
Bringing Biomolecules and Electrodes together: Understanding Electron Transport in Life (details)

Symposium 19:
Physicochemical and Mechanistic Aspects of Organic Electrosynthesise (details)

Symposium 20:
Recent Development in Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for Atomic/Molecular Level Understanding of Electrochemical Interfaces (details)

Symposium 21:
Electrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Storage: from Fundamentals to Applications(details)

Symposium 22:
Molecular Electrochemical Switches, Pumps, and Machines (details)

Symposium 23:
Electrochemistry Knowledge transfer: from academy to Startup Company and Industries. (details)

Symposium 24:
Electrochemistry and my life (details)

Symposium 25:
General Session (details)


Symposium 1
Recent Developments in Analytical Electrochemistry: from Fundamentals to Devices

Sponsored by :
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry

This symposium will focus on recent advances made in electroanalytical chemistry and electrochemical sensors and biosensors. It will highlight how designing integrated electrochemical systems, notably driven by the emergence of novel (nano)materials, can lead to sensing devices with enhanced sensitivity, improved selectivity and greater stability. Innovation in the field also originates from new strategies for monitoring and quantifying emergent species of biological or environmental importance, based on low cost, portable and automated electroanalytical systems. Special focus will be made on operational devices, elaborated from the conceptual aspects to the apparatus building (sensing element, transduction system, associated electronics, data acquisition and treatment), up to the application to real case analyses.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: i) advanced electrochemical sensing and instrumentation, ii) ultra-sensitive and selective electrochemical detection for health and environment, iii) new materials design for improved electroanalytical

Symposium Organizers
Alain Walcarius (Coordinator) (alain.walcarius@univ-lorraine.fr)
Rasa Pauliukaite (division 1)
Joohoon Kim (Kyunghee Univ.)
Wonyong Lee (Yonsei University)

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Symposium 2
Functional Surfaces and Electrochemically Active Materials: Preparation and Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The symposium will cover the latest findings in both synthesis of novel electrode materials via their deposition, including additive manufacturing methods, or surface modification and their applications to perform chemical and electrochemical transformations at their surface or inside the electrode.
Contributions are welcome in, but not limited to, the following areas:

Symposium Organizers
Daniel Mandler (coordinator, division 1) daniel.mandler@mail.huji.ac.il
Luca Magagnin
Mikhail Vorotyntsev
Youngmee Lee
Seongpil Hwang
Yuanzhe Piao

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Symposium 3
Electrochemistry at Liquid/liquid Interfaces: From Fundamental to Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

The symposium focuses on latest developments in electrochemical methodologies and approaches utilizing a polarized liquid/liquid interface for a wide range of applications including analytical, environmental, physical, pharmaceutical and bio related research fields. The symposium aims to overview both the state-of-the-art research and technological progress alongside discuss future aspects and challenging issues in the area.

Topics include but are not limited to

  1. Biomembrane-mimic interfaces for pharmacokinetic evaluation and functional DDS of ionizable drug;

  2. Heterogeneous formation of highly-ordered nanostructure/molecular assembly and its application;

  3. Development of novel spectroelectrochemical technique for interfacial molecular organization;

  4. Development of electrochemical assays for bio and environmental monitoring;

  5. Ionic liquid exploration as electrolyte in batteries and fuel cells

  6. Redox flow batteries

Symposium Organizers
Hye Jin Lee (Coordinator) hyejinlee@knu.ac.kr
Hirohisa Nagatani (Co-chair)
Zhifeng Ding (Co-chair)
Grégoire Herzog (Co-chair)
Damien Arrigan (Co-chair)

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Symposium 4
Bioelectrochemistry: from fundamentals to applications

Sponsored by:
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

In this symposium, all aspects of bioelectrochemistry will be discussed. The aim is to highlight new concepts and trends to understand electron transfer processes in biology, both fundamental and applications. Interfacial electron transfer involving proteins, bioinspired molecules, nucleic acids, metabolic chains, and cells are invited to be presented. Papers presenting experimental as well as theoretical and modelling aspects of biological electron transfer systems and processes will be considered. The symposium will focus on the design and imaging of nanostructured interfaces as well as new experimental tools to understand and to characterize electron transfers at the molecular level.
Applications of electrochemistry in biosensors and bioelectronic devices, biocatalysis for fuel production and fine-product synthesis, energy conversion and storage via enzymatic or microbial fuel cells, biosupercapacotors, photosynthetic system exploration, waste degradation, and CO2 reduction, will be emphasised.
Topics include but are not limited to:

Symposium Organizers
Elisabeth Lojou (coordinator), Chercheuse CNRS, France, lojou@imm.cnrs.fr
Shelley Minteer, University of Utah, USA
Taek Dong Chung, Seoul National University, Korea
Seong Jung Kwon, Konkook University, Korea
Xing-hua Xia, Nanjing University, China
Wakako Tsugawa, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan

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Symposium 5
New Electrochemical Approaches and Devices for Monitoring Diseases and Human Health.

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

The symposium focuses on recent developments in electrochemical sensing systems and approaches for biomedical research and clinical diagnostics, also including electro-biological models for drug discovery, toxicity evaluation and antibiotic resistance screening. The symposium aims to overview both the state-of-the-art research and technological progress in the area.
Topics include but are not limited to

Electrochemical assays and diagnostic devices for disease prognosis and monitoring and therapy evaluation;

Drug delivery and wearable healthcare devices (including those for disease monitoring) based on electrochemical working principles;

New strategies for production, modification and application of micro- and nano-electrodes for in-vitro and in-vivo biosensing;

Development of in vitro and animal models for electrochemical screening of drugs and cellular transformations during diseases.

Symposium Organizers
Elena Ferapontova (coordinator, Div. 2) elena.ferapontova@inano.au.dk
Ilaria Palchetti (Co-chair, Div. 1)
Haesik Yang, Pusan National University, Korea)
Zong-Hong Lin, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan
Ahyeon Koh, SUNY Binghamton, USA
Hitoshi Shiku, Tohoku University, Japan

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Symposium 6
Advanced lithium-ion batteries; from basics to cutting-edge technologies

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

Lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous power sources for a variety of applications ranged from consumer electronics to electric vehicles and grid-based energy storage systems. Battery energy density and performance depend critically on the materials used, so the development of new materials and a fundamental understanding of electrochemical phenomena are important for advancing battery technology. The symposium is devoted to the discussion on both fundamental and applied aspects of the advances made in lithium-ion batteries, from the design of new electrode materials, electrolytes, interfaces and mechanism analyses to the improvement in performance, cycle life and safety.

The organizers would like to invite contributions to the following topics but not limited to:
-cathode materials
-anode materials
-electrolytes; new salts, solvents, additives
-electrode-electrolyte interfaces/interphases, interfacial phenomena
-separators
-inactive components
-studies of reaction mechanism and success/failure modes
-modeling and theoretical aspects
-electrode formulation and processing, and cell design
-advanced in-situ/ex-situ surface and bulk analysis techniques
-performance characteristics and cycle life analyses of cells.

Symposium Organizers
Seoung-Wan Song (Coordinator, swsong@cnu.ac.kr)
Kyung Yoon Chung (Co-organizer)
Christian Masquelier (Co-organizer)
Gu Lin (Co-organizer)
Hikari Sakaebe (Co-organizer)
Dominic Bresser (Co-organizer)

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Symposium 7
Next-generation Batteries: Novel chemistry and design

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

The expected growing demand for next-generation electrical energy storage systems that have higher energy density, safey and lifetime, the search for next- generation batteries are driving the research towards identifying new electrochemical systems capable to store huge quantities of energy. Moreover, wearables, medical and environmental sensors and other applications require new features and battery designs that traditional battery technologies cannot provide. Post Li-ion systems -such as Li-S, Li-air, all-solid-state batteries, Na-ion and redox flow batteries etc.- and flexible, thin and/or printed batteries can be the promising cadidates satisfying these demands. This symposium is therefore devoted to recent progress in the fundamental and applied aspects of post-LIB systems from the design of next-generation electrode materials, electrolytes, interfaces and cell shape/configurations to the improvement in performance of batteries.

The organizers would like to invite contributions to the following topics but not limited to:

  1. Li-air, Li-sulfur, Li metal battery

  2. All solid-state batteries: polymer, inorganic and hybrid electrolytes, bipolar system

  3. Redox flow batteries

  4. Al- or Zn-air batteries

  5. Sodium-ion batteries

  6. Large scale batteries

  7. Battery shape: Flexible, thin, micro-, fiber, printed batteries

  8. Studies of reaction mechanism and success/failure mdes

  9. Electrode formulation and processing, and cell design

  10. Specialty batteries for medical and military applications

Symposium Organizers
Silvia Bodoardo (Coordinator, silvia.bodoardo@polito.it)
Joaquín Chacón
Alberto Varzi
Kisuk Kang
Yong Min Lee
Jungdon Suk

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Symposium 8
Challenges in Battery Technologies for Advanced and Next-generation Electric Vehicles and Grid Storage

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium will focus on advances in medium and large-sized lithium rechargeable batteries for electric vehicles(EVs) and energy storage system(ESS) commercialized by cell makers. The symposium is designed to be invitation only mainly for companies. The symposium deals with how to design batteries for EVs and ESS respectively and what major factors should be considered from materials to cell design. In addition, this symposium aims to address battery management and cooling systems including battery safety issues as well as module and pack design. The symposium aims to overview both the state of the art development and research progress in the EVs and ESS batteries.

Topics include but are not limited to:

Symposium Organizers
Young-Gi Lee (coordinator), Local, lyg@etri.re.kr
Je Young Kim (co-organizer), Local
Karim Zaghib (co-organizer), Div 3

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Symposium 9
Understanding and application of fast storage processes (Supercapacitors & high power systems)

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium will be dedicated to the most recent investigations related to fast storages processes and their use in real-world application. The goal of this symposium is to address several aspects related to these processes including:

(1) capacitive materials;

(2) pseudocapacitive materials;

(3) practical electrochemical systems components, including current collectors, binders and separator

(4) novel characterization methods for storage electrochemical processes;

(5) development and investigation of new device designs (symmetric and asymmetric),

(6) theory and modeling. The program will consist of both invited and contributed papers that address one or more of the above topics.

Symposium Organizers
Andrea Balducci (coordinator)andrea.balducci@uni-jena.de
Wataru Sugimoto
Sonia Dsoke
Woong Kim
Ho Seok Park

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Symposium 10
Electrochemical systems for energy conversion:  Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

This symposium will cover both fundamental and applied studies ranging from novel functional materials to complete cells and stacks for energy conversion within fuel cells and electrolysers 

Specific topics are as follows:

Symposium Organizers
Frédéric Jaouen (Coordinator, France) frederic.jaouen@umontpellier.fr
Minhua Shao (China)
Chang Hyuck Choi (Korea)
Sang Hoon Joo (Korea)
Jonghyun Jang (Korea)

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Symposium 11
Electrochemical Conversion of Carbon Dioxide and its Utilization

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology

This symposium will focus on the recent advances in electrochemical Carbon Dioxide (CO2) conversion from fundamental understanding to industrial application toward producing valuable fuels and chemicals. It covers the topics of CO2 reduction catalysts, electrolyzers, in-situ techniques, theoretical and experimental approaches, and the scale-up technologies, as well as beyond CO2 chemistry. 

Topics include but are not limited to:

Beyond CO2; valorization of nitrogen (NxHyOz), carbon (CxHyOz), and sulphur (SxOy) compounds

Symposium Organizers
Youngkook Kwon (main organizer), ykwon@unist.ac.kr
Yun Jeong Hwang (co-organizer)
Christopher Hahn (co-organizer)
Boon Siang Yeo (co-organizer)
Ruud Kortlever (co-organizer)

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Symposium 12
Corrosion and corrosion protection

Sponsored by:
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

This symposium includes all aspects of corrosion science and technology with a special focus on corrosion protection strategies using functional protective coatings and multi-scale modelling.
 
Topics include but are not limited to:

- Corrosion mechanisms of metal and alloys;
- Protective coatings and surface treatments including electrochemical processes;
- Corrosion inhibitors and high-throughput/in-silico screening methods;
- Multi-scale corrosion modelling;
- Passive films and advanced electrochemical and analytical tools for their characterization;
- Localised electrochemical and surface analytical techniques in corrosion research;
- Nuclear corrosion;
- Corrosion of metallic biomaterials;
- Corrosion of steel in concrete;
- Atmospheric corrosion and accelerated corrosion tests for bare and coated materials;
- Mechanically assisted corrosion;
- Corrosion and corrosion protection of drinking water systems, mining and mineral industry, chemical industry;
- Corrosion of archaeological and historical artefacts;

Symposium Organizers
Mikhail Zheludkevich (mikhail.zheludkevich@hzg.de)
Achim Hassel
Monica Santamaria
Vincent Vivier
Sungmo Moon
Chan Jin Park

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Symposium 13
Advanced Processes for Materials Recycling: from Batteries to E-Waste

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

The demand for batteries continues to grow including applications such as electric vehicles and electronics devices. The proper disposal of these batteries and the recycling and reutilization of materials is a critical need. Furthermore, metals such as Ni, Co, Cr, Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, Zn, and V are widely used as based catalysts for multiple applications, including: oil refining, batteries, chemical processes, air emissions control, etc. During such processes, these catalysts will degrade over time, losing their catalytic utility and eventually become waste. In the electronics industry especially, these metals represent a significant portion of the waste from deprecated board circuits. The production of such wastes (spent catalysts, batteries, and board circuits) has become one of the major environmental concerns in these industries, mainly due to their toxicity and metal emissions.

This symposium will provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of the most recent developments on the advanced processes for the recovery and recycling of materials. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

(1) new electrochemical technologies for metals recycling,

(2) scale up demonstration;

(3) Materials processing and testing;

(4) life-cycle analysis demonstrating the impact of the technology in recycling of batteries components/e-waste;  

(5) recycling of graphite anodes and carbon materials;

(6) electrochemical performance of recycle batteries and materials;

(7) applications and economic analysis

Symposium Organizers
Gerardine Botte (coordinator, division 5, gerri.botte@ttu.edu)
Clara Santato (co-chair, division 3)
Fabio La Mantia (co-chair, division 4)
Il-Chan Jang (co-organizer, local)
Youngsik Kim (co-organizer, local)

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Symposium 14
Electrochemical Technology for Process Intensification and Sustainability

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Process intensification consists on the combination of multiple unit operations in a process with the intend of reducing operational costs, equipment size, energy consumption, and/or waste generation while maintaining a production goal. Chemical engineers had been working in process intensification since the early 1990. With the availability of renewables, electrification had become a viable option for providing energy in the form of electricity. Electrochemical technologies can play an important role in process intensification by enabling process pretreatment and efficient separations.

This symposium will provide an international forum for the presentation and discussion of approaches for the incorporation of electrochemical routes in process intensification.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

(1) hybrid electrochemical/thermal chemical reactors,

(2) novel electrochemical reactor designs,

(3) electrochemical separations,

(4) selective oxidation/reduction processes,

(5) applications and economic analysis

Symposium Organizers
Manuel Rodrigo (coordinator, division 5, Manuel.Rodrigo@uclm.es)
Minhua Shao (coordinator, division 5, kemshao@ust.hk)
Monica Santamaria (co-chair, division 4)
Chan-Soo Kim (co-chair, local), KIER (Korea Institute of Energy Research)
Sang Hoon Kim (co-chair, local), KIST (Korea Institute of Science and Technology)

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Symposium 15
Anodization and Its Applications in Environmental and Energy Research

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science

Anodic processes have the ability to form a wide range of metal oxide nanostructures on any refractory metal and many semiconductors on a scale from nm to mm. The symposium will deal with all aspects of anodic reaction systems such as anodization mechanisms of advanced materials, formation of self-organized metal oxides, surface modification of metals and semiconductors as well as state of art applications such as binder-free electrode, catalysis and environmental/energy applications. Papers presenting experimental as well as theoretical and modelling aspects of anodization systems and processes will be considered. This symposium will show the current state of anodic synthesis engineering science and practice, novel anodization method and new materials as well as innovative methodologies, and will hopefully suggest a way forward.

Topics include but are not limited to:
• Anodic self-organization (experimental and theoretical approaches)
• Electrochemical anodization on surfaces, generating functional nanostructures
• Anodization of metals/semiconductors/alloys
• Electrochemical doping in anodic oxides
• De-alloying or anodic conversion of metal to multi-purpose functional metal oxide structures
• High aspect ratio or extreme thin anodic oxide film: anti-corrosion and coloring purposes 
• Novel applications of electrochemically synthesized anodic materials

Symposium Organizers
Jinsub Choi (coordiantor) Inha University (jinsub@inha.ac.kr)
Giovanni Zangari(co-coordiantor), University of Virginia
Hiroki Habazaki, Hokkaido University
Kiyoung Lee, Kyungpook National University

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Symposium 16
Mathematical modelling in electrochemistry – from molecular scale to the process design

Sponsored by:
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

Mathematical modelling represents a powerful tool of increasing importance in all domains of research and development, including electrochemistry and related fields. Its role is inevitable in understanding processes occurring on a molecular scale, as well as in analysis of complex experimental data or in design and optimization of electrochemical processes and systems. With increasing power of standard computers accompanied by rapid development of mathematical methods and related software, problems of high complexity can nowadays be solved. This rapid development however, raises a number of new important questions and challenges. Efficient approaches are searched allowing to approach new problems and/or to reduce the number of simplifying assumptions. Reliable mathematical methods are developed able to solve complex models of limited stability.

The target of this Symposium is to bring together specialists from fundamental and engineering sciences. This will allow fostering interdisciplinary collaboration and advancement of the novel approaches in the field of mathematical modelling of electrochemical processes and devices through discussion of experts in the individual fields.

Symposium Organizers
Karel Bouzek (coordinator, division 5, Karel.Bouzek@vscht.cz)
Francois Lapicque (Division 5)
Alejandro Franco (Division 3)
Jürgen Fuhrman (Division 7)
Hyungjun Kim (Local)
Hyung Chul Ham (Local)

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Symposium 17
Molecular Electroanalysis

Sponsored by:
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Molecular electrochemistry and Electroanalysis are reciprocally indissolubly linked and reciprocally provide fundamental support. In fact (i) on one hand the elucidation of electron transfer process mechanisms is the necessary condition for the conscious, straight optimization of new electroanalytical methods and protocols (rather than random or trial-and-error ap­proaches, unfortunately very common), (ii) on the other hand, electroanalytical techniques, also combined with other analytical and/or computational ones, are providing more and more power­ful tools for the elucidation of complex electron transfer mechanisms or of electron transfer pro­ces­ses in complex molecules or materials. In this context the type and extent of information ob­tain­able for electroactive molecules can be remarkably widened. The symposium will thus parti­cularly focus on: electroanalytical tools, techniques and/or protocols for the elucidation  of elec­tron transfer processes, particularly in complex molecules and materials:  new approaches or ap­pli­cation of existing ones to solve complex cases; Electroanalytical tools, techniques and/or pro­tocols, and/or integration with other analytical or computational techniques enabling to extend the range of information obtainable for electroactive molecules and materials; Optimization of elec­tro­analytical methods or protocols on the basis of electron transfer mechanism elucidation etc.

Symposium Organizers
Patrizia R. Mussini, Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy) patrizia.mussini@unimi.it
Luigi Falciola, Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy) luigi.falciola@unimi.it
Guobao Xu, State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, China
Olivier Buriez, École Normale Superieure, Département de chimie, Paris (France)
Dongil Lee, Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
Jongwon Kim, Department of Chemistry, Chungbuk National University, Korea

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Symposium 18
Bringing Biomolecules and Electrodes together: Understanding Electron Transport in Life.

Sponsored by:

Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry

This symposium will gather scientists working within the rapidly expanding community of BioMolecular Electronics and related fields, who are using electrified interfaces to understand the key ingredients supporting electron transfer/transport in life. The symposium will cover all aspects of electron transport/transfer in molecular or biomolecular moieties where the electrochemical characterization has or could find an essential role. In order to put together researchers with very distinct perspectives of this topic, the symposium will target studies that range from fundamental approaches, including single-molecule or nanoscale electrical platforms and computational modelling, to micro-scale molecular junctions involving hybrid micro/nano-structured materials for device applications. Such wide vision will ensure attracting researchers interested on very different aspects of molecular electron transport, namely, from physical mechanisms and structural aspects of it, to those interested on potential electrical applications such as molecular transistors, (bio)molecular sensors, sequencing platforms, etc.

Symposium Organizers
Ismael Díez-Pérez, King's College London (UK), ismael.diez_perez@kcl.ac.uk
Pau Gorostiza, Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (Spain)
Renata Bilewicz, University of Warsaw (Poland)
Magdaléna Hromadová, J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry (Czech Republic)
Byung-kwon Kim, Sookmyung Women’s University (Korea)
Yangrae Kim, Kwangwoon University (Korea)

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Symposium 19
Physicochemical and Mechanistic Aspects of Organic Electrosynthesis

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Recently, organic electrosynthesis has been attracting much attention of chemists in various fields, due to its dual nature of sophisticated/simple approach for synthesis including high selectivity with environmentally benign system. To better design reactions for organic electrosynthesis, deep understanding of physical electrochemical aspects is an important issue. This symposium will cover a broad range of topics including, but not limited to: organic electrosynthesis, organometallic electrochemistry, the role of electrode materials in organic electrosynthesis, mechanistic investigations, theoretical calculations, mediators and other modes of electrocatalysis, unusual media, asymmetric electrosynthesis, and related areas. The purpose of this symposium is thus to bring together the leading scientists working in all these aspects, in order to stimulate intensive discussion and initiate/foster collaborations.

Symposium Organizers
Shinsuke Inagi (Tokyo Institute of Technology) (inagi@cap.mac.titech.ac.jp)
Shen Ye (Tohoku Univ.)
Amanda Garcia (TNO - Dutch Institute for Applied Science)
Siegfried Waldvogel
Marilia Goulart
Jiri Ludvik

Hyun S. Ahn
Hai-Chao Xu

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Symposium 20
Recent Development in Spectroscopy, Microscopy and Theory for Atomic/Molecular Level Understanding of Electrochemical Interfaces

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry

This symposium covers the application of fundamental techniques both in operando experimental electrochemistry (Vibrational spectroscopy, STM/AFM, XAFS/SXS, DEMS, single crystalline electrodes) and computation chemistry (density functional theory, molecular dynamics-based simulations) for the investigation of electrochemical and chemical processes in batteries and fuel cells, taking place at the solid/liquid interface. Both experimentalists and theoreticians are addressed to present and share recent trends and advancements in their fields, in which particular attention is given to application of advanced experimental techniques as well as combination of experiment/theory to provide unprecedented insights into the solid/liquid interface at the atomic and molecular level.
Main topics of this symposium cover:

Symposium Organizers
Kei Murakoshi (Hokkaido U). kei@sci.hokudai.ac.jp
Kai Exner (Sofia U.)
Hardwick, Laurence J. (Liverpool U.) 
Aimin Ge (Tohoku U.)
Jongwoo Lim (Seoul National University)
Beomgyun Jeong (Korea Basic Science Institute)

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Symposium 21
Electrochemical Solar Energy Conversion and Storage: from Fundamentals to Applications

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engi- neering and Technology

Natural photosynthesis is the most important and complex electrochemical reaction on Earth. It combines the delicate balance of absorbing visible photon energy, generating (molecular) charge carriers and reaction centers in a highly complex natural scaffold organization. Life, as it is now, is underpinned by this highly efficient energy conversion system. However, the huge increase in energy demand and the need of significant cuts in carbon emission require solar energy conversion processes that are faster, more efficient and robust than natural photosynthesis. To explore advances in the area of electrochemical solar energy conversion, this symposium will bring together scientists in key domains such as material science, solid state physics, photochemistry and molecular design.
The symposium will be covering the following topics:

  1. Emergent inorganic semiconductor electrodes: new materials such as nitrides, oxy-halides, III-V and complex transition metal oxides beyond TiO2, Fe2O3 and BiVO4

  2. Semiconductor/electrolyte interfaces: first principle modelling as well as in situ spectroscopy and microscopy studies of the photoactive interfaces

  3. Dynamic photoelectrochemistry: recombination kinetics and mechanism; time and frequency response analysis photoelectrochemical systems; charge transport in mesoscopic systems

  4. Solar Fuels: photoelectrochemical water-splitting and CO2 conversion

  5. Hybrid photoactive systems: dye sensitized photoelectrodes; photoactive polymer systems, photoelectrochemistry at molecular interfaces

  6. Toward femto electrochemistry: ultrafast charge transfer, adiabatic vs nonadiabatic charge transfer, response of electric double layer after ultrashort pulse irradiation

  7. Plasmonic effects: Hot electron driven electrochemistry, light mater interaction on nanoscale, electrochemical active site vs optical local field

Symposium Organizers
David Fermin (U. Bristol)
Yujin Tong (Fritz Haber Institute)
R. Abe (Kyoto U.)
Chi-Hwan Han (KIER)
Hong Chul Moon (Univ. Seoul)
Hyunwoong Park

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Symposium 22
Molecular Electrochemical Switches, Pumps, and Machines

Sponsored by:
Division 7, Physical Electrochemistry
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

Recent interest in biomimetic nanopores and nano-scale mechanisms has led to new concepts in nanopore functionalities, e.g. ionic diodes, electrolyte pumping, single molecule translocation, and in some cases coupled chemical processes that occur when ionic species are forced through nanopores. In the field of membranes, ionic diode phenomena and current rectification have been observed also for micro- and fluidic devices, again coupled in some cases to chemical reactivity, e.g. bipolar redox processes or water heterolysis.

In this symposium, we would like to bring together contributions from inter-disciplinary areas including theory and simulation, nanopore electrochemistry, microfluidic, membrane devices, and molecular systems that provide (photo-)electrochemical functionality leading to switches, pumps, and machines. The idea is to develop new bio-mimetic processes that allow electrical energy applied to a membrane to be converted into chemical energy (including concentration gradients and chemical transformations).

Symposium Organizers
Frank Marken (University of Bath, UK)
Yitao Long (Nanjing University, China)
Martin Edwards (University of Utah, USA)
Do Hwan Kim
Jeong-Yun Sun

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Symposium 23
Electrochemistry Knowledge transfer: from academy to Startup Company and Industries.

Sponsored by:
Division 3, Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage
Division 1, Analytical Electrochemistry
Division 2, Bioelectrochemistry
Division 4, Electrochemical Materials Science
Division 5, Electrochemical Process Engineering and Technology
Division 6, Molecular Electrochemistry

This symposium will provide an international forum focused on knowledge transfer in electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering. It will highlight how innovation in several fields where electrochemistry plays a key role, from energy storage and conversion, to materials processing and engineering, sensing, water treatment, biomedical devices, and bioelectrochemistry impacts on the economic growth of our society by creating skilled job opportunities from an entrepreneurial point of view. It will also highlight activities related to open innovation and strategic industry/university partnership towards research, development, and commercialization.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: i) spin off experiences of academic research products from academy, ii) public organisations programs that are supporting knowledge transfer actions, iii) successful cases of established companies funded as spin off, iv) Open Innovation programs and strategic industry/university partnerships, v) funding opportunities by business angel associations and venture capitals.

Symposium Organizers
Francesca Soavi (coordinator, division 3)
Francesco Di Franco (division 4)
Gerardine Botte (Co-Chair, division 5)
Jose Zagal (Co-Chair, division 6)
Chang Hyun Lee
Jae Ho Shin

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Symposium 24
Electrochemistry, Looking Back Looking Forward: Personal Perspectives

Sponsored by: All Divisions

Electrochemistry, dating back to Galvani, Volta, and Faraday, has been evolving over the past two centuries and pervading every region of the globe that includes east asia. Harmonizing with recent technological revolutions, it is getting into a new phase to drive many other related disciplines. Modern electrochemistry is now at the center of human life as well as industry, undoubtedly owing to the immese contribution of numerous electrochemists. Electrochemistry is what electrochemists do. The lives of electrochemists are the history of electrochemistry. This symposium is to share invaluable experiences and achievements of the main figures who have been leading the national and international electrochemical societies. All speakers will be invited to give their experiences in research and education in conjunction with their life stories. This will be homage to the predecessors and also inspiration to the successors for the sustainable future of electrochemistry.

Topics of interest are widely open to every aspects of electrochemistry.

Symposium Organizers
Woonsup Shin, (Coordinator) Sogang University, South Korea
Taek Dong Chung (Local)

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Symposium 25
General Session

Sponsored by: All Divisions

This symposium will cover conceptual aspects, fundamentals, and applications of all ISE areas which are not compatible with the topical symposia. This symposium will provide a forum for researchers and graduate students to present their recent advanced research results of general interests to the ISE meeting attendees. The purpose of this symposium is to foster and promote work in both electrochemical sciences and technologies, and to stimulate researcher and student interests and participation in ISE. A competition for the best poster in electrochemical sciences and technologies will be part of the symposium. A best student prize will be given to the presenting student author on the winning paper.

This symposium will cover all ISE areas not compatible with topical symposia. Oral contributed papers will be programmed in some related order, depending on the titles and contents of the submitted abstracts.

Symposium Organizers
Chi-Chang Hu (coordinator, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan), cchu@che.nthu.edu.tw
Laurence J. Hardwick (University of Liverpool, UK),
Hochun Lee (DGIST, Korea)

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